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25lb. vs. 50lb. little giant


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#1 Christopher Rice

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Posted 25 June 2012 - 10:30 AM

I'm looking at making my first power hammer purchase, was hoping some of you with experience would chime in on the pro's and cons of a 25lb. vs. 50lb. little giant. I've never used one before, but like most things I buy I'd rather spend a bit more now to get something I won't outgrow, then to try to make the situation right down the road. I do mostly ornamental iron work, nothing out of the ordinary or heavy which makes me think that a 25 would be fine, but who knows what could come down the road. Is there that much difference between the two? I also assume that with a 50lb. I would need to beef up my shop floor to handle the vibrations made, wondering what you all recommend for that. Thanks in advance for your help!!
-chris
[center][font="Century Gothic"][size="5"][color="#8B0000"]Christopher & Jacquelyn Rice

C.N.Y. Glass & Metal Design Studio

#2 Tony Mertens

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Posted 25 June 2012 - 12:50 PM

This is purely my opinion only. I built my own mechanical power hammer. It's a 55 lb. hammer. I've never used a Little Giant. I have used a "real" self contained power hammer. I'm told that the mechanical I built has similar performance to an LG because both are mechanical. From the prices I've seen for good used Little Giants I would save some more money (not much more in some cases) and get a self contained hammer. Much better control and no adjusting for various thickness of materials. Again - just my thoughts as I've never used an LG.

#3 Randy McDaniel

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Posted 26 June 2012 - 08:22 AM

Chris, If you are set on a mechanical hammer I'd go with the 50 pound. I had a 25 pound Champion and once you'r over 3/4" or so stock it has to run faster to push the metal. The faster it runs the less control you have. It becomes a slapper instead of a hammer. With a 50 you don't have that problem. Check out the brakes that some are using on their mechanical hammers. It gives you a lot more control and that's what it is all about. Ideally an air hammer will give you the most control, but the mechanical with a brake is the next best thing.

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#4 knots43

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Posted 26 June 2012 - 10:27 AM

I agree that 25 pound hammer is a likely to limit you in what you might do. I purchased a 25 pound Moluch 30 years ago used it for about 10 years after a major rebuild. It sure was a big plus supplementing the hammer and anvil. However as soon as I could I purchased a self contained air hammer. Mine is a smaller unit with a 55 pound tup. I have never been sorry that I made that change. The significant difference between the mechanical hammers and self contained air hammers is that there is no slop in the tup which means that the dies hit/contact in exactly the same location on every stroke. This offers a big advantage and opportunity to use special tooling/dies and make these hammers more flexible than mechanical hammers which run in less precise dovetail ways.

In any event the 50 pounder is a better choice because it provides you with a wider range of capabilities. Good luck and happy forging.

Oh - And if you get a hammer that has the anvil block cast integrally with the hammer frame The floor should be ok if you place the hammer on a piece of steel plate, multiple layers of plywood laminated together, or a light timber matt.

Edited by knots43, 26 June 2012 - 10:45 AM.


#5 Christopher Rice

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Posted 02 July 2012 - 08:17 AM

Thanks for your input guys, I've decided to go with the Anyang 33 in place of the 50lb. LG. Can't wait for it to get here now!
-chris
[center][font="Century Gothic"][size="5"][color="#8B0000"]Christopher & Jacquelyn Rice

C.N.Y. Glass & Metal Design Studio

#6 knots43

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Posted 02 July 2012 - 08:48 AM

Good decision . After having seen your work my, guess is that you will never regret that choice.

#7 Christopher Rice

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Posted 09 July 2012 - 10:42 AM

Thanks, I can't wait!!
-chris
[center][font="Century Gothic"][size="5"][color="#8B0000"]Christopher & Jacquelyn Rice

C.N.Y. Glass & Metal Design Studio




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