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#1 BucketObolts

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Posted 12 June 2012 - 04:15 PM

I am looking at the idea of getting a TIG machine. I have done some TIG welding in welding school a number of years ago.
Not sure on how much machine I need. Most of you have seen the projects I have done. Mostly small beads and so far just mild steel. I don't see my self welding SS,or Alum.
Not sure if the machines that run on 110 and have a air cooled torch would do the trick.
Anyone here run a TIG welder on 110V? What are your thoughts?
Scott

What you have to do is to think that each leg, foot, ear or whatever is a separate sculpture and all together make the finish piece.


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#2 Closing Rivets Up

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Posted 12 June 2012 - 06:41 PM

I used a Miller Maxstar 150 for a while, everything I'v posted here was welded with it, it was trouble free. I also welded some 1/4" plate and 2"x.120 box tubing with no problems.

I recently traded up to their Maxstar 200 to get down to 1 amp. its an ego thing, here again a perfect welder. I dont think it has a 100 percent duty cycle, but I dont need one.

Jim

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#3 Tony Mertens

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Posted 12 June 2012 - 06:52 PM

If you don't think you will do aluminum you can get by with the machines that are DC only. A lot cheaper. You could stil do stainless, copper, and or bronze. For what you do I would save the money that you would spend on a water cooled torch. I'd recommend getting a name brand one from a local weld shop.

#4 BucketObolts

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Posted 12 June 2012 - 08:10 PM

If you don't think you will do aluminum you can get by with the machines that are DC only. A lot cheaper. You could stil do stainless, copper, and or bronze. For what you do I would save the money that you would spend on a water cooled torch. I'd recommend getting a name brand one from a local weld shop.


I don't like cheap machines. My local airgas sells Miller and Lincoln. I didn't realize that there are DC only machines. He was making out that the air cooled torches are not very good. Maybe he is trying to up sell on the machine?
Scott

What you have to do is to think that each leg, foot, ear or whatever is a separate sculpture and all together make the finish piece.


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#5 Closing Rivets Up

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Posted 12 June 2012 - 08:18 PM

If I need to weld aluminum I can always run Helium as the shield gas, its more expensive but you do what you have to do.

I bought the Miller to do automotive and motorcycle sculptures and I have no complaints, I sold the Maxstar 150 for what I paid for it.

Jim

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#6 BucketObolts

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Posted 12 June 2012 - 08:21 PM

I used a Miller Maxstar 150 for a while, everything I'v posted here was welded with it, it was trouble free. I also welded some 1/4" plate and 2"x.120 box tubing with no problems.

I recently traded up to their Maxstar 200 to get down to 1 amp. its an ego thing, here again a perfect welder. I dont think it has a 100 percent duty cycle, but I dont need one.

Jim


Are the Maxstar a scratch start or do you hit the foot pedal and start the arc?



Scott

What you have to do is to think that each leg, foot, ear or whatever is a separate sculpture and all together make the finish piece.


https://www.facebook...198296093595655

#7 Kevin Caron

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Posted 12 June 2012 - 09:05 PM

Just my 2 cents worth,

I have been using a Longevity machine for about 7 months now. Not been kind to it at all and it has never let me down. About half the price of the big names and in my opinion just a good a machine if not better.

They have two machines that run on 110 and do ac/dc. Worth the look for a starter machine....
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#8 Rich Waugh

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Posted 12 June 2012 - 10:18 PM

I'll second what Kevin said. I have a Longevity TIG machine, one of their older ones, and have been using it trouble free for five years now. I don't do much aluminum with it due to the absence of a water-cooled torch, though. Aluminum takes a bunch of heat and that means a hot handpiece really quickly. If you plan to do much aluminum, get the water-cooled torch. Longevity sells one, too. For what you save on the machine you can easily get the water-cooled torch and still be a lot of money ahead. Longevity is good about supporting their equipment, too. I wouldn't even consider any other brand of Chinese welder due to the quality/support issues, but Longevity is a good one. Their machines are built to very tight specs and live up to their advertising claims.
The older I get, the better I used to be.

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#9 Closing Rivets Up

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 05:33 AM

Are the Maxstar a scratch start or do you hit the foot pedal and start the arc?


Foot pedal

Jim

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The large print givieth, the small print taketh away.

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#10 BucketObolts

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 07:09 AM

What kind of cups does it use? Same as the big brands? Do you like the torch?

Just my 2 cents worth,

I have been using a Longevity machine for about 7 months now. Not been kind to it at all and it has never let me down. About half the price of the big names and in my opinion just a good a machine if not better.

They have two machines that run on 110 and do ac/dc. Worth the look for a starter machine....


Scott

What you have to do is to think that each leg, foot, ear or whatever is a separate sculpture and all together make the finish piece.


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#11 Kevin Caron

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 09:04 AM

Same cups as everyone else. My torch has the finger on off switch. It also came with a pedal but I have never used it.

Torch feels softer than my Miller 200 syncro. Has a bendable head for any angle you need. Can also get a water cooler if needed.

Longevity has a try before you buy program. Someone in your area with a machine will let you try it out. Check on the website or just give them a call. They have been very helpful and easy to work with.

Heck, if you get to Phoenix come on by and try mine. I have 4 different ones to play with.
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#12 BucketObolts

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 12:57 PM

How do you start the arc? Scratch or pedal(hand control)?
Did it come as a complete package, or did you need to get the torch and regulator ETC?
I had not heard of Longevity before. The price does seem very attractive! But in the back of my mind is saying "you get what you pay for". I am glad to hear that both of you are happy so far.
Not sure when I will be ready to buy, but this is some good info.

Same cups as everyone else. My torch has the finger on off switch. It also came with a pedal but I have never used it.

Torch feels softer than my Miller 200 syncro. Has a bendable head for any angle you need. Can also get a water cooler if needed.

Longevity has a try before you buy program. Someone in your area with a machine will let you try it out. Check on the website or just give them a call. They have been very helpful and easy to work with.

Heck, if you get to Phoenix come on by and try mine. I have 4 different ones to play with.


Scott

What you have to do is to think that each leg, foot, ear or whatever is a separate sculpture and all together make the finish piece.


https://www.facebook...198296093595655

#13 Kevin Caron

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 01:48 PM

You can either start with the pedal/finger control. (High freq). Or scratch start, my machine will do both. I have a TigWeld 250 AC/DC.
Mine came with a torch and regulator.

The price is very fair and it comes with a 5 year parts and labor warranty

I will pm you my number, it is easier to talk than type.

Hope to chat soon..






How do you start the arc? Scratch or pedal(hand control)?
Did it come as a complete package, or did you need to get the torch and regulator ETC?
I had not heard of Longevity before. The price does seem very attractive! But in the back of my mind is saying "you get what you pay for". I am glad to hear that both of you are happy so far.
Not sure when I will be ready to buy, but this is some good info.


~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.

Kevin Caron kevin at kevincaron.com 602-952-8767


~. inspired sculpture for public & private places .~


http://www.kevincaron.com

#14 tommyguns

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 03:11 PM

I've been using a Lincoln 175 air cooled tig for 10 yrs. Very good machine for the money,($1400) but not for anything heavy. If your gonna weld over 1/8th inch material, I recommend a water cooled torch. Of course they are quite a bit more cash. I see they now make a flex torch for the 175 as well. [Big Grin] Miller does make an awesome tig welder, if I were to purchase a new one, it would be Miller.
Good luck in your search,
Guns

#15 Tony Mertens

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 06:24 PM

I still say that for the type of work you are doing I'd just get the air cooled torch. If it gets too hot it is cheaper to work on something else for a while. But if you really want to get rid of the money you can send it to me. [Big Grin]

#16 BucketObolts

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 07:12 PM

After talking with Kevin (thanks Kevin) I am really thinking about a Longevity machine. More than likely the 200D

https://www.longevit...TIG-Welders.php

Not sure how soon I will be in the market, but for the money these seem like a lot of bang for the buck.
Scott

What you have to do is to think that each leg, foot, ear or whatever is a separate sculpture and all together make the finish piece.


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#17 Rich Waugh

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 10:53 PM

I think you'd be happy with that machine, Scott. I have a Miller Synchrowave 200 that I'v enever realy used since the much more compact Longevity unit does what I need to do 99% of the time. If I had a job to do with aluminum, I'd definitely opt for the Synchrowave since it has the water-cooled torch. though. One thing to keep in mind is that your consumables will last longer in a cooled torch than a hot one, as well as your hands. Aluminum (and bronze alloys) can take a bunch of heat to weld cleanly and allow you to maintain a smooth pass - the water-cooled torch make a big difference in this.

Note: Based on my pleasure with the Longevity TIG unit, I also purchased one of their plasma cutters that also seems to work well. It is a very basic model with scratch lift-arc start only, but for my work it is fine for now. If I was going to b eusin g it on a PLasmaCam or the like, I'd opt for one with the high-frequency arc start instead, of course. For my freehand and edge guide work, the lift arc is just fine.
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#18 docweathers

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Posted 25 November 2012 - 09:30 PM

Don't overlook Craig's list as a source. I have gotten all of my shop including my Lincoln AC/DC tig welder on craigslist for less than half price. all of it has performed very well

Lawrence Weathers
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Pottery
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#19 BucketObolts

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 04:39 PM

Well with the nod from Kevin and Rich I bought a Longevity machine today. Looks like it shipped out today.
I went with one of their newest machines. It's a DC only.
http://www.longevity...igWeld-200i.php
I think it will do what I want.
Scott

What you have to do is to think that each leg, foot, ear or whatever is a separate sculpture and all together make the finish piece.


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#20 ShawnM

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 10:16 AM

Oh boy, a new toy! Hope it serves you well.
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