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Varnish to protect patinas


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#21 kinglerch

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 08:28 AM

I tried ColorLoc and while I can see how it is preserving *some* color, there is still no getting around the loss of the subtleties. First, ColorLoc smells like hell in a can. I used it as directed, 2 very light coatings, though it also says to saturate patinas. The unfortunate result of this is that the color variances created by "dry" and "wet" colors, are much more similar to each other.

 

I included a photo, though I'm not sure how much of what I described can be seen in it. The shot on the left is just plain patinaed steel, on the right is with 2 coats of ColorLoc. It brings out some nice colors, but it mostly enhances darks at the expense of lights. But due to the fact that most lights are "dry" (for lack of a better term) I can't see any coating being able to preserve them.

 

YMMV.

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#22 crquack

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 06:44 PM

I am not sure if it is just the way I am seeing the photos but it looks like the ColorLoc changed the colors in places quite substantially.



#23 ianinsa

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 10:30 PM

I'm not sure that you will find this helpful but some years ago I was trying to preserve some paying on copper and I sprayed it with hairspray first and then clearcoat without that much change to the patina color. I can't remember the brand of either product so I'm sorry if this isn't as helpful as it could be. At the time it seemed like the hairspray 'sealed and protected ' the patina from the wetting effect.



#24 kinglerch

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 08:30 AM

I am not sure if it is just the way I am seeing the photos but it looks like the ColorLoc changed the colors in places quite substantially.

 

Indeed, the colors are substantially different. Some are lost and some are new/enhanced, but a "lock" on the color this doesn't appear to be.



#25 kinglerch

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 06:56 AM

My understanding (maybe incorrect) is that all patinas on steel are a form of rust. By that I mean if not coated from the elements, the patina will eventually turn to rust, and it will do so faster than the plain steel next to it. I have had a lot of luck preserving these patinas for indoor use using a basic satin from Krylon or Rustoleum.

 

But outdoors what appears to be happening is the UV from the sun bakes off the protection from the Home Depot products, leaving the rust to have a field day. Outdoor steel art that were in a more shaded area seem to retain a decent level of protection from rust. However, it seems that the more extreme the environment (water, UV, etc) the greater the necessary protection, and the more the protection will change the look of the patina.

 

For example, a light dusting of Krylon satin for indoor use was fine and changed the patina very little, however the exposure is very limited. Several coats of Rustoleum gloss protects *ok* for outdoor use, but changes the lighter patinas a lot. The thicker and "wetter" the sealer, the more the lighter colors are lost. I don't see this as a fault of the sealer as much as a fact of light diffusion, diffraction, etc.

 

I also recently used Ever-Clear. It is a "two part acrylic urethane" where you mix a portion of part A into part B, and you have 6 hours to do all your coats. Using it was pretty easy, as long as you can plan all your coats and amounts. It isn't always easy to know how much you will need beforehand, but it seems to go farther than you'd think. After 2-3 coats, the protection seemed quite thick. I have high hopes it will protect from sun, wind, and rain for quite some time. However, the affect on the patina was pretty severe.

 

You can see in the two attachments how the patinas changed, as if they were held underwater. For the green/blue patina (on copper/bronze paint) the effect was very nice. On bare steel, the effect was fine, difficult to notice. But on the lighter patina (rust) the lights were lost to the darks. Again, this is not unexpected due to the coverage thickness. Where the Ever-Clear was thinner, the change in patina was less severe.

 

I would also like to try Clear Guard (which I understand is similar to  Permalac) to see how it does or does not change the patinas, but my guess is that outdoor protection is directly correlated to how much the patina (especially light colors) are affected. I read a lot of complaints that Permalac didn't end up protecting outdoors for very long. But I would be interested to read other's experiences with protecting patinas, while also retaining them.

 

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#26 Tony Mertens

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 03:14 PM

Any clear will change the coloring.

 

I've had pretty good luck with Permalac and now Clear Guard.  It has some UV protection and sometimes I coat the lacquer with clear wax for more UV protection.  Eventually nature still wins.  Be sure to neutralize your patina with acetone and apply the clear immediately after the acetone evaporates. If you apply the wax you can clean it and re-wax as needed over time.



#27 InMyImage

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Posted 16 September 2014 - 02:42 PM

Have any of you ever tried an archival photographic protective spray? These are specifically designed to preserve the colors of photographic prints, and now even come in types for digital prints.

 

I used to use these back in my photojournalism days and they are very good at preserving the true color and texture of a photo print without any discoloration.

 

Bill


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