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How do I get a rusty look without the metal rusting any further?


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#1 SirNorris

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 01:09 PM

Hello MAF users!

I am looking to get a nice consistent weathered/rusty finish similar to the link below but I do not want to let the metal keep rusting after it reaches a certain point. This is for some decorative plating that will go around a fireplace and I'm looking for both how to weather the metal along with how to finish and prevent it from rusting any further. I'm not looking to clear coat, unless I can get a matte finish.

http://dreamtextures...22-20110217.jpg

Thanks for your help everyone.
-R. Michael
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#2 blboise

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 03:36 PM

Hello MAF users!

I am looking to get a nice consistent weathered/rusty finish similar to the link below but I do not want to let the metal keep rusting after it reaches a certain point. This is for some decorative plating that will go around a fireplace and I'm looking for both how to weather the metal along with how to finish and prevent it from rusting any further. I'm not looking to clear coat, unless I can get a matte finish.

http://dreamtextures...22-20110217.jpg

Thanks for your help everyone.

There are many ways to rust it (look up rust patina on this forum) but your example is rusted to the point of flaking. If you want that look, it is most likely going to continue to rust -- I would guess putting any sealer on would reduce the "flake" look by bonding between the edge of the flake and the under lying materials and therefore not be the look you want. Besides the finishing -- getting that much advancement of corrosion is really going to take some time in my opinion. I think I'm seeing rust over rust -- it could even be a function of the metal itself. It reminds me of a old 55 gallon burn barrel that has been left outside several years and had repeated fires inside.

It also looks like it is a mixture of flaking metal AND flaking paint from it being rusty underneath.

I'll be interested in what others propose.

Edited by blboise, 27 February 2012 - 03:42 PM.


#3 SirNorris

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 03:44 PM

Sorry, I did this from my phone and didn't get the best look at the attached image. I guess I'm not looking for THAT much rust since that photo has air pockets in it, this would be more along the lines my client is looking for.

http://cloud.graphic...hered-steel.jpg

That may even be a little much but certainly closer than my first post. The rusting isn't the issue as much as stopping and preserving the material once I get a desired finish.
-R. Michael
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#4 Rich Waugh

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 04:45 PM

First off, how much heat is this thing going to be exposed to? That will affect the type of finish you'll be limited to, I would guess.

Rusting the stuff is easy - have it sandblasted and then spray it with either Clorox bleach or hydrogen peroxide and put it in a "tent" of plastic sheeting to retain the humidity. A bucket of sand placed in the tent and wetted with the rusting solution will help, too. Wait three or four days and there you go, instant rust. Antiques made while you wait.

There are plenty of matte finish clear coats and you're going to need to find one that will withstand the heat near the fireplace. I'd look at Thermalox paints - Google 'em. That's what I use on my gas forge, though I have no idea if they even make a clear coat. Without some sort of a coating, the rust will rub off on everything that comes in contact with it.
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#5 warrent

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 05:48 PM

You can get various colors of rust, from an orange to a dark brown using ferric nitrate. The ferric nitrate is more of a surface type of rust. It can easily be clear coated with Permalac that withstands 200 degrees F. To find ferric nitrate you can get it from http://www.sculptnouveau.com/. Only thing buying it from them is the concentration of the mix. I buy ferric nitrate crystals from http://www.scienceco...inaformulas.htm where you can mix your own concentrations for various colors. Also you can mix some ferric oxide which will gave some reds. Like any patina process you are using chemicals, may they only be household, but you need to adhere to safety guidelines. Furthermore patina processes is an art by itself and may require multi tries to get it correctly.
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#6 saign charlestein

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 06:05 PM

muratic acid will cause rust really quick. Its the stuff they put in pools. Be careful though...nasty stuff. If you make a tent like rich suggested and leave a bottle of that open in the tent, it'll rust really quick. Also if you add salt to the hydrogen peroxide like Rice suggested, it will speed up. And theres also the Japanese brown from http://www.sculptnouveau.com/

Edited by saign charlestein, 27 February 2012 - 06:07 PM.


#7 AvishaiW

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 10:11 PM

There is a special type of weathering steel that will rust to a certain stage and than will stop rusting with no need to paint it or to protect it. It is used mainly for steel sculpturs.
The trade name is CORTEN steel. You can google it or find some details in wikipedia.

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#8 Randy McDaniel

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 07:29 AM

Again, depends on the heat, how dark you want it and how much it's handled. I did a interior gate for the oldest building in Gettysburg and once done had it sandblasted, used a spray bottle to spray on a hydrogen peroxide and table salt mix and waited 2 days with repeated coats of spray. Then hosed it down good and let it air dry. Then I used an oxy/acetylene torch with a rose bud and heated up a small section to just a black heat, wiped on olive oil with a rag and let that burn into the surface. Once done I took a clean rag and wiped it all down. It made a rich brown with good highlights for the forged detail. For maintenance the client just has to wipe it down every couple of years with olive oil and buff it. It looked like the gate had been there from the beginning of the construction.

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#9 knots43

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 07:43 AM

Have a look at this thread. Rust Painting Website by Sean Healy .

<div><br></div><div>Also look at this website . &nbsp; it would be worth your time to PM Brad &nbsp;he has been doing tis a long time. &nbsp;</div><div>mesacreativearts.com</div>

Edited by knots43, 29 February 2012 - 08:36 AM.


#10 SirNorris

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 08:52 AM

Great suggestions everyone, exactly what I was looking for. Thanks!
-R. Michael
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facebook.com/rmichaelart

#11 Gene Olson

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 07:41 PM

I ran into a guy at the local artsoup, art show one summer who had some incredibly complex rust corrosion structures in his pieces...

Wow,
how do you do that...

well:
It turns out he lives in a town with a company that maintains river barges on the Mississippi (et al) system. they put new bottoms in barges that show weakness. ie a few small leaks.
and that translates into lots of interesting corrosion patterns that have developed for years until a few have become obnoxious in that they finally won the race to cut through. It is weird, plates may be sound with small sections of intense complex corrosion.

Great found art though, if you have a good eye
and know enough to edit.
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