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Drilling hardened tool steel??


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#1 Kevin Caron

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Posted 06 September 2010 - 02:35 PM

Here I go again. [Beer]

So I broke one of the blades in my wood chipper the other day. [Head Phones}[Beer]

New ones are not available. The guy at the saw shop was nice/mean enough [Beer][Punk][Beer] to give me a stick of hardened tool steel that is sharpened for a blade. The problem is there are no holes in it for the bolts.

How the heck do I drill this stuff?

My cobalt drills will not even make a start in it.


Any ideas??
~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.

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#2 John B

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Posted 06 September 2010 - 02:36 PM

Stellite drills will work if you can get them

#3 ArtWerkz

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Posted 06 September 2010 - 03:19 PM

Kevin, maybe a visit here will help.
http://www.dormertoo...net/s003591.nsf
or perhaps anneal the piece, drill it and then re-harden.
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#4 Kevin Caron

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Posted 06 September 2010 - 05:17 PM

Boy, I show nothing on this side of the pond.

I'll keep looking tho. Thanks for the tip.






Stellite drills will work if you can get them

 
Thanks. I will look over here also.




Kevin, maybe a visit here will help.
http://www.dormertoo...net/s003591.nsf
or perhaps anneal the piece, drill it and then re-harden.


~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.

Kevin Caron kevin at kevincaron.com 602-952-8767


~. inspired sculpture for public & private places .~


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#5 Chuck Girard

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Posted 06 September 2010 - 05:20 PM

You Call Me and I'll take care of it for you.
OR
The way to acheive your goal is:
Carbide Drills or EDM or another tool source.
I would be more than happy to help.
Hey I'm free and Local!!!!!!![Head Phones}
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#6 PTsideshow

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Posted 06 September 2010 - 05:48 PM

here is some info on drilling hardened steel
You will have better luck finding them over in England as the seem to be more popular there, then here.
When Thomas Register's Thomcat on line comes up with no listings for Stellite drill makers. [Beer]
tempering drilling and then re hardening seems to be the best choice.
[Head Phones}
glen

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All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

#7 bigfootnampa

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Posted 06 September 2010 - 07:12 PM

Not sure how thick your blades are but I believe that I would try a different approach. Think about annealing just the spot where you want to make a hole... then any good drill will work. This is usually done with a rod of hot steel held against the target area. If your steel is too thick to make this strategy work without ruining the temper of the larger area then do it in steps... annealing just a thin layer and then drilling through it and reheating to anneal another layer... just keep on keeping on until you get to the other side! Of course the other reasonable solution is to anneal the whole thing and drill it and then re-heat treat it. I have also heard of guys with lasers who can spot anneal that way. Then there is the tortoise method where you use grit and a wooden dowel to drill and just basically grind your way through no matter how long it takes (might be faster than you think... many a hole has been made this way, even in thick stone).

#8 Kevin Caron

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Posted 06 September 2010 - 07:26 PM

Oh wise and mighty Chuck Roast,

Help me Chuck Roast, you are my only hope!!!


Ok, corny has hell but you know what I mean. Please, if you can stop by or I will run this over to you. Whatever works.

thanks Chuck


P.S.

Karma looks awesome!


Would be proud to have it in my yard.



You Call Me and I'll take care of it for you.
OR
The way to acheive your goal is:
Carbide Drills or EDM or another tool source.
I would be more than happy to help.
Hey I'm free and Local!!!!!!![Head Phones}

 
Only 1/8th inch thick but I got nothing to work with. Chuck and his mighty mill are my next best hope here. Otherwise it's a month or so before the factory blades are available and they are made out of used banana peels.

Thanks for the tips. I will file them away for future reference.

Kevin



Not sure how thick your blades are but I believe that I would try a different approach. Think about annealing just the spot where you want to make a hole... then any good drill will work. This is usually done with a rod of hot steel held against the target area. If your steel is too thick to make this strategy work without ruining the temper of the larger area then do it in steps... annealing just a thin layer and then drilling through it and reheating to anneal another layer... just keep on keeping on until you get to the other side! Of course the other reasonable solution is to anneal the whole thing and drill it and then re-heat treat it. I have also heard of guys with lasers who can spot anneal that way. Then there is the tortoise method where you use grit and a wooden dowel to drill and just basically grind your way through no matter how long it takes (might be faster than you think... many a hole has been made this way, even in thick stone).


~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.

Kevin Caron kevin at kevincaron.com 602-952-8767


~. inspired sculpture for public & private places .~


http://www.kevincaron.com

#9 Deathatsix

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Posted 06 September 2010 - 08:31 PM

I'm far from any expert, and don't know what it might do to the surrounding steel, but how about a plasma cutter? some autobody shops have them and if you could find one that has one they are pretty percise depending on the user.

#10 Kevin Caron

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Posted 06 September 2010 - 08:48 PM

Yeah, that's my fall back if Chuck Roast can't help. But I am pretty confidante that he can do it. If not....BURN IT!!

k


I'm far from any expert, and don't know what it might do to the surrounding steel, but how about a plasma cutter? some autobody shops have them and if you could find one that has one they are pretty percise depending on the user.


~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.

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~. inspired sculpture for public & private places .~


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#11 AvishaiW

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Posted 06 September 2010 - 08:48 PM

Do not anneal and re- harden unless you know the steel type. If it is High Speed Steel it would be almost impossible to re harden without having a high temp controlled kiln. When I have to drill hardened steel I use a Solid Carbide drill preferrably with 3 flutes, use on a stable machine, slow speed and a lot of coolant.

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#12 Kevin Caron

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Posted 06 September 2010 - 08:57 PM

Tried a brand new cobalt 2 flute and it didn't even make a mark.

What the heck is this stuff??

I am beginning to think the guy at the saw shop is screwing with me.

Help me Ob wan Chuck, you are my only hope!!!

(sometimes i crack myself up, other times I worry about myself)

Shoot, the damn glass is empty again.....




Do not anneal and re- harden unless you know the steel type. If it is High Speed Steel it would be almost impossible to re harden without having a high temp controlled kiln. When I have to drill hardened steel I use a Solid Carbide drill preferrably with 3 flutes, use on a stable machine, slow speed and a lot of coolant.


~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.

Kevin Caron kevin at kevincaron.com 602-952-8767


~. inspired sculpture for public & private places .~


http://www.kevincaron.com

#13 bigfootnampa

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Posted 06 September 2010 - 09:52 PM

Yeah now that I remember I have heard of using plasma cutters too... they blow a pinhole through and the heat softens the area enough to finish with a drill.

#14 Chuck Girard

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Posted 07 September 2010 - 05:50 AM

I'll Call you later this afternoon.
I'm more than happy to help!!
[Peace]


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A.K.A. CHUCK ROAST


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#15 sparkmeister

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Posted 07 September 2010 - 07:12 AM

Sometimes I have that problem when drilling holes in knife tangs.
I use a concrete bit and sharpen the carbide a little with a diamond hone.
Dave J
www.santacruziron.com

#16 David S.

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Posted 07 September 2010 - 07:31 AM

Hey Kevin,

"Watcha doing?" Sorry, but I couldn't help it (you have to have seen some of Kevin's videos to appreciate the quote). Although it looks as though Chuck will have you covered, if that doesn't work out, a couple of things I've used in past that might help, depending on the size of the hole(s) you need: I've used a common nail chucked in a drill press to rub against the base metal to heat a very localized spot to a red heat and then let it slowly cool to anneal - as someone mentioned above. When so foolish as to attempt to remove a broken stud with an "EZ Out", which of course broke, I've used a masonry drill (carbide tipped) to drill out the offending harden steel "EZ Out."

My opinion (worth about as much as Free Legal Advise) is that attempting to anneal the entire piece of Mystery metal and then re-hardening it to a proper state for something that spins around at a high rate of speed to smash other things might be a bit on the dangerous side - if it came apart it could completely ruin your beret, causing you to drop your chocolates and wine, not to speak of damage to your standing as an International Artist!!!!

Take care all,

Dave and One-eyed Eddie on the Edge of America, where at least one of us has had waay tooo much morning caffeine

#17 philip in china

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Posted 05 October 2010 - 11:26 PM

A very simple and effective way to drill hard steel. Most people won't believe it but it works.

Use a tungsten carbide tipped masonry drill. Lubricate it with water. It will skate over the surface for long enough. You will keep thinking that I have fooled you into doing something silly when suddenly it will bite. Once it starts cutting the swarf will come off at a tremendous rate.

I have used this method on some very hard material and it does work.

#18 Kevin Caron

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 07:22 AM

Thanks Phillip;

I will try this also.

I might have to buy more tool steel just to try all the different ideas I am getting here.
~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.

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~. inspired sculpture for public & private places .~


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#19 Kevin Caron

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 08:22 PM

So a big thank you to the mighty Chuck Roast is due. Not only did he clue me in to "A2 tool steel" but he also stopped by today with his drills and countersink. Now all I have to do is take it to the sharpeners and then heat-treat them.

Thanks Chuck, I own you one.

kevin
~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.

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#20 Mills

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Posted 16 October 2010 - 03:17 PM

a little late to the party but if one is around Waterjet is the beans for this problem.
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