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Green patina for mild steel?


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#1 KST1

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Posted 31 March 2008 - 02:32 PM

Hello,

We're working on a project that will end up as a table top "tree like structure". The leafy mass will be made from peices of 16 gauge mild steel.

Is there a patination process that would give a motled green effect to the mild steel?

Thanks in advance,

-Derek

#2 ShawnM

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Posted 31 March 2008 - 02:34 PM

One option might be Vista Green patina for steel by Sculpt Nouveau. Here's a photo so you can see if this is something like what you're lookin' for:

Posted Image
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#3 Tony Mertens

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Posted 31 March 2008 - 07:37 PM

Here's another option from Sculpt-Nouveau. Cupric Nitrate. If you use it be sure to experiment first, I haven't figured how to control the green vs. brown.

cattail_1056.JPG

#4 Coppretta

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Posted 01 April 2008 - 08:29 AM

Use less, sort of drybrush it on, don't let it pool= more green[Big Grin]

Here's another option from Sculpt-Nouveau. Cupric Nitrate. If you use it be sure to experiment first, I haven't figured how to control the green vs. brown.



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#5 KST1

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Posted 01 April 2008 - 08:40 AM

Well Shawn, that is definitely green. A bit brighter than I was looking for. I'm looking for a deeper forest green like a big oak tree in summer kinda thing.

The cupric nitrate is an option if I can get more green than brown.

What about solvent dies?

Thanks,

-D

#6 ShawnM

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Posted 01 April 2008 - 09:12 AM

What about solvent dies?


You could certainly do a blend of solvent die colors to get most any shade that you want. I'd suggest playing around with some options to see what you can come up with. Green alone would be too bright for what you want, but could be mixed with brown or black to tone it down. Or you could layer a darker color over a green base for a more mottled effect.
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#7 KST1

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Posted 01 April 2008 - 11:10 AM

That's kind of what I was thinking. Layers and mixing until it was what I wanted. Looks like I need to pick up the Sculpt Nuveau sample kit and give it a whirl.

-D

#8 Tony Mertens

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Posted 01 April 2008 - 03:16 PM

The Universal patinas from SN can also be layered. I did some fall colored leaves awhile back by layering green, red, yellow, and orange over japanese brown.

#9 Coppretta

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Posted 02 April 2008 - 06:04 PM

A green like that can easily be made from the red blue and yellow Solvent dyes, Add lots of yellow a little blue to get green and add a tiny bit of red to deepen it. I mix all my solvents colors from those three colors. So does Sculpt Nouveau. The transparency of their primaries makes them very predictable and easy to mix thousands of variations. Once you add white or black there's no going back, though!

I wanted to also mention that no matter what patina I use, wiping down with acetone just prior to patina always helps. Bear in mind though, I only work in copper, so I don't know about other metals...
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#10 Frosty

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Posted 02 April 2008 - 11:35 PM

Barb:

Can you tell me more about solvent dyes please?

How they work, durability, where to get them, etc.?

Thanks,

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#11 Coppretta

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 12:34 AM

SculptNouveau.com [rockon]

I mix them with Permalac lacquer (also from SN)

Great indoors and out, 10 years outdoors I'm told...at least. I have yet to do an outdoor piece.

You can carefully layer the colors with clear lacquer between them if you are careful. If I want a really bright color I do a couple of layers of white and then clear... dry very well..(couple days at least) then carefully lay on a color coat Dry well and then more clear.. if you want darker..repeat. Takes practice but the results are amazing.

Debbie there is Very helpful, and they have some really neat "special" mixtures too.
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#12 Frosty

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 12:44 AM

So, it's basically paint. No?

Not that I'm against paint.

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#13 PTsideshow

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 02:45 AM

More like a tinted clear when you mix it with permalac or other clear sealer.
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#14 ShawnM

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 04:14 AM

So, it's basically paint. No?

Not that I'm against paint.

Frosty


It's like paint in that it sits on the surface of the metal, rather than having a chemical reaction with it. It is, however, quite transparent and does not apply at all like paint. You can achieve lots of different effects through layering and application techniques. There's some info in the patina demo also...[rockon]
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#15 KST1

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 08:44 AM

Barb,

Are you suggesting I should simply buy the red, yellow, and blue solvent dies for my project and then play with the mixture. I was thinking of the sample kit, but if I don't really need it...

I have mixed paints and such before with great results, but the solvent die transparent thing is new to me.

Thanks for all the great info,

-Derek

#16 Tony Mertens

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 07:06 PM

If you can justify the cost, one of the finish kits gives you alot of different products to experiment with. Most of the bottles are small but they go a long way. After playing with them you can always just order your favorites. If you ever get the chance to attend one of Ron Young's seminars I would highly recommend it. Entertaining and educational.

#17 Deafboy

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 08:09 PM

I'm looking for a deeper forest green like a big oak tree in summer kinda thing.

The cupric nitrate is an option if I can get more green than brown.



Thanks,

-D


I've have good success with cupric nitrate over ferric nitrate.
It creates a green/reddish brown motled patina. For more green just add more cupric....
Dan~ Posted Image




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