Jump to content


Photo

How to check forge temperature?


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Hollywood

Hollywood

    Skilled Metalsmith

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 176 posts

Posted 24 February 2008 - 10:16 PM

Whats the best way to check the temperature that the forge is putting out? I'd like to know if my forge is living up to its potential. Also, what is a good temperature that it should be running at?

Thanks

#2 g4x4xgeoff

g4x4xgeoff

    metal monkey

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 517 posts

Posted 25 February 2008 - 01:49 PM

non contact thermometer.
Geoff Hawley

-Experience is simply the name we give our mistakes.

#3 ornametalsmith

ornametalsmith

    Ornamental metalsmith

  • Metal Artist Forum Sponsor
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,029 posts

Posted 25 February 2008 - 02:05 PM

pyrometer
Bill
http://www.CustomDesignMetalArts.com/
http://www.FloridianForge.com/

Class/Workshop info:
http://www.customdes...com/studio.html
Specializing in: Teaching and Making
hand forged and cast works of Metal Art.
Crafted with the utmost attention to detail.
For discriminating tastes and opulent surroundings

Posted Image

#4 dan@modernblacksmith

dan@modernblacksmith

    over ambitious underacheiver

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 88 posts

Posted 25 February 2008 - 03:15 PM

lick your finger and touch the brick....a 1 millimeter high blister means 1800f a 2 millimeter blister =1900f etc. etc.
"life is tough, but it's tougher when you're stupid" John Wayne
www.modernblacksmith.com

#5 ornametalsmith

ornametalsmith

    Ornamental metalsmith

  • Metal Artist Forum Sponsor
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,029 posts

Posted 25 February 2008 - 04:06 PM

lick your finger and touch the brick....a 1 millimeter high blister means 1800f a 2 millimeter blister =1900f etc. etc.


we'll need a video of that TIP too, Dan.
[hysterical]
Bill
http://www.CustomDesignMetalArts.com/
http://www.FloridianForge.com/

Class/Workshop info:
http://www.customdes...com/studio.html
Specializing in: Teaching and Making
hand forged and cast works of Metal Art.
Crafted with the utmost attention to detail.
For discriminating tastes and opulent surroundings

Posted Image

#6 David S.

David S.

    Metal Master

  • Metal Artist Forum Sponsor
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,242 posts

Posted 25 February 2008 - 04:15 PM

Ornametalsmith has the official, correct, scientific answer, but does it really matter (the question, not Bill's answer)? What I'm attempting to say is that the actual empirical temperature is not that important; what really matters is if the forge is getting your metal to the temperature that you need it to be at to perform whatever process you are attempting. I know this sounds a bit glib, but unless you are designing or critiquing forges, why would you care what the "number" is? I have absolutely no idea what actual temperatures my coal forge or my Chile propane forge are at any particular time, but I do know if they are performing as I need them to. I hope this does not sound like a smart ass comment, but except for a matter of curiosity ( a good thing, by the way), I don't see why you would need to know what the actual temperature your forge is operating at: sometimes you need a red heat; sometimes you need a yellow/white heat. There are optical pyrometers and thermocouples that can be used to measure accurately the temperature, but either of these options would be relatively expensive. Temperature monitoring/measurement is of more importance in a foundry situation or when tempering metal, but if your forge works, why worry about what the temp is? If you really, really want to know what the temperature inside your forge is, I can send you some information on making a thermocouple pyrometer that would probably give you the information you want.

Take care all,

Dave and One-eyed Eddie, who spent a long day trying to straighten out the shop, so we may be a little cranky, mea culpa, mea culpa

#7 g4x4xgeoff

g4x4xgeoff

    metal monkey

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 517 posts

Posted 25 February 2008 - 04:26 PM

David's right. a pyrometer is the best solution, i forgot about them when i posted.

however, a non contact thermometer will do the same, not as accurate, but accurate enough for a a fraction of the cost.
Geoff Hawley

-Experience is simply the name we give our mistakes.

#8 dan@modernblacksmith

dan@modernblacksmith

    over ambitious underacheiver

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 88 posts

Posted 25 February 2008 - 06:01 PM

the thing I always noticed about my propane forge was that it heated small rods and bars just fine but the heavier stuff was too slow, now coal heats the heavy stuff just fine and the light stuff is easily burnt if you're not paying attention....
"life is tough, but it's tougher when you're stupid" John Wayne
www.modernblacksmith.com

#9 Duckworth

Duckworth

    Finger Masher

  • Metal Artist Forum Sponsor
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,337 posts

Posted 25 February 2008 - 06:22 PM

Post: #11RE: Any one here have the big Chily forge?

Duck I've tapered 4" square bar on my big blue, it was slw to start with because it really doesn't have enough stroke for that material but it did a great job, I'd say if your having problems your forge is not getting the material hot enough, Not to down play Chili forges forges, but I have a Six burner N/C forge and I do a lot of heavy forging and it's never let me down. And again let me say Chili foge has one of the best forges around, I remember when he was building the prototypes they were even some of the best out there and still are.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"GRIZZ"
Maker of unique one of a kind Ironwork, vessels and repousse'
http://www.grizzlyiron.com
http://www.grizzfab.com




experience talks....
duck[Peace}




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users