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#1 g4x4xgeoff

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 04:12 PM

I have a negative of a face I'd like to create a positive of in metal.

I'm thinking of creating a clay positive then coating it with metal powder, however I'd like to be able to separate the clay from the metal...effectively making sheet metal.

Is this possible, and if so, how workable is the metal once cured...can i grind it smooth and maybe patina it?
Geoff Hawley

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#2 Tony Mertens

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 04:29 PM

Geoff,

Sclupt Nouveau has a liquid iron metal coating. It could be applied to the clay but would not be able to be removed. It would accept a patina. They also have brass, bronze, copper, and pewter.

Tony

#3 tommyguns

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 04:53 PM

Don't be so hard on yourself, you're face can't be that bad.[Peace}
Sorry, I have no real input, just could'nt resist.
[Peace} Out
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#4 g4x4xgeoff

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 05:27 PM

Tony, what if i coated the clay but destroyed the clay, would that release it or does it become part of the ceramic?
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#5 PTsideshow

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 07:10 PM

As long as you can can live with an epoxy base metal metal paint like coating. They have aluminum powder or brass or bronze powder. Be prepared for shock as it coats a bundle. The powders were sold to mix with paint. I only have a quart of aluminum left.
You can use almost any clay/putty type metal epoxy based industrial repair stuff Devcon is one example.
There is a high metal content paste called Lab metal it comes in a can or caulking tube. It is lacquer based,but when set up you can do almost anything but weld it. Drill, file, thread ect.
lab metal they also have this and devcon at mcmasters

Then there is the low temp alloys some that melt in boiling water that you can heat and cast. Cerro metal is one brand name. Pewter is something that you can consider. Melts at 300'F to 425'F depending on the alloy.
Petwer and Belmont solder300'F lead free
main page
page 3496 is the one you want for the alloys Cerro and others

Ideal for casting, these low-melting-temperature alloys expand as they solidify, pushing into every crevice of the mold for superior duplication. Easy to machine and tool, they're also good for repairing broken dies and patterns. They're ideal for creating fusible links and for holding irregular and contoured parts during machining: just mold the alloy over a component, machine, and then melt off the alloy. Ingots weigh approximately 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 lbs.


Again it all depends on what you want to do with the finished piece.

If the size isn't to large there is the PMC precious metal clay In silver sterling and in gold it is a little pricey, but when baked it burns the clay binder away and leaves only the metal.price the current market rate for silver plus a fabrication charge for the clay binder.
PMC site

For the clay you may want to consider using sculpey and baking it then powering in a lower temp metal. I can't remember what temp its good for.
scupley
From page 3496 mcmaster web site catalog
Casting Retainer Putty
Also known as Babbitt putty, this fibrous material is just what you need for molding and sealing. It's often used in foundries, mills, and pattern shops. Putty is dense, tacky, moisture-free, and safe for handling. It also resists heat, cold, and weather. Great for casting low-melting-point alloys and lead as well as in machinery installation. Melting point is 978 F.

One think you may or may not know with the kids clay the oil based
non harding type. most if heated will turn liquid and can be poured in a form to make a positive or negative and then go from there. It will also work to remove it.

I'm sort fond of the pewter casting grains and casting pewter. Buckles and then soldering the belt backings on them or repairing the pewter buckles you buy and the wires come off or something else breaks. Here are two shots of a pewter test buckle I cast and then had to resolder the belt back on as the original style of bail and pin proved not to work out.DSCF9032.JPG
The front is epoxy 2 part glue with dye I was experimenting with looking for one that will give good performance. everyone has its own oddities as regards to bubbles, leveling and the dye and amount of dye can affect it and repairing fish eyes, and bald spots.
DSCF9033.JPG

And you can look for a shop in your area that sinters metal the powder metal under high pressure into a mould to form it. And see if they will sell you a pound or so but you will have to mix it with a epoxy base to use it at home.
glen

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All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

#6 Tony Mertens

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 07:29 PM

Geoff,

The stuff I'm talking about is really ground up iron (or copper ect.) suspended in a laquer. You would use 2-3 coats but it is really just like paint so I don't believe it would be removable. It is the same product I mentioned in your coppersurfboard thread.

Tony

#7 g4x4xgeoff

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 01:13 PM

Tony,

I'm surprised you remembered that thread.

I completely forgot about it because a week later I was talking to the client they opted to just do fiberglass look so the only thing i did was take two junked surfboards and create the worlds widest dado
Geoff Hawley

-Experience is simply the name we give our mistakes.

#8 Alexander Metal

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 04:59 PM

Hey PT, where do you get your belt parts, like the belt back, etc? I've been thinking about making some buckles.

#9 PTsideshow

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 06:45 PM

The one in the picture are a stamped steel wire a separate wire bail.
I bought a gross from Tandy wholesale when they still had a local outlet.current price and page.
They haven't gone up much since I bought them.
They as stated good for 1 1/2" to 1 3/4" wide belts the most common size now.
You can screw them to the item 3 pre punched holes. Solder them braze or weld them. Pewter or regular solder works equally well.
I also use them to repair the pewter buckles that the bail wears out the holes. Some brass tube to fit the wire and solder the tube to the back of the pewter buckle.
I have used bronze gas rod for the loop and pin on some or just steel copper clad rod to if it will work.
[Angry]
glen

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All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

#10 Alexander Metal

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Posted 08 January 2008 - 05:29 PM

The one in the picture are a stamped steel wire a separate wire bail.
I bought a gross from Tandy wholesale when they still had a local outlet.current price and page.
They haven't gone up much since I bought them.
They as stated good for 1 1/2" to 1 3/4" wide belts the most common size now.
You can screw them to the item 3 pre punched holes. Solder them braze or weld them. Pewter or regular solder works equally well.
I also use them to repair the pewter buckles that the bail wears out the holes. Some brass tube to fit the wire and solder the tube to the back of the pewter buckle.
I have used bronze gas rod for the loop and pin on some or just steel copper clad rod to if it will work.
[Angry]


Thank you, sir! That's exactly what I was looking for. [Beer]




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