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Pitted texture transfer


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#1 Fred Zweig

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Posted 17 August 2007 - 08:48 AM

Here is a rather simple technique I use for preparing my metal before constructing a piece.

I have acquired prized pieces of pitted hardened steel. One of my favorites is this broken pick. I place it on a sandbag to keep it from bouncing around as I strike it.
Texture demo (00).JPG Texture demo (02).JPG

The hammer I use is slightly rounded to help concentrate the force of the blow.
Texture demo (03).JPG

I anneal the copper so that the texture will more easily transfer into the soft metal and then place the front of the copper onto the anvil and hammer on the back. I move the copper as I hammer and periodicaly turn it over to check progress and to decide where to hit next.
Texture demo (05).JPG

Half of the surface covered & complete coverage. Sometime I leave portions untouched for contrast.
Texture demo (06).JPG Texture demo (07).JPG

Here I have flame colored it and waxed it.
Texture demo (08).JPG

An example with bury patina.
Texture demo (09).JPG

Textures can be transfered from a number of objects. Cement, rocks, etc.

Voila!
Fred
"So much to learn and so little time"
Musings of a Metalsmith
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#2 PTsideshow

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Posted 17 August 2007 - 08:56 AM

[OMG][Beer][OMG] Great demo, super idea now to hunt for a great textured surface[Big Grin]<img src=' />[Beer]
[OMG]
glen

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All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

#3 Alfredo Alamo

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Posted 17 August 2007 - 10:28 AM

You are the man[Worthy][Beer][Worthy]... Thank you for sharing that with us

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#4 Alfredo Alamo

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Posted 17 August 2007 - 10:45 AM

By the way I had not noticed you footnote "So Much To Learn So little Time" That is so freacking true. If someday I make it into one of matt's classes I will stop by your studio, you have a lot of talent my man.[Beer][Worthy]<img src=' />
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#5 Matt Weber

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Posted 17 August 2007 - 04:07 PM

Very cool Fred![Worthy]

#6 sayward

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Posted 07 February 2008 - 02:14 PM

That's beautiful. Thank you for sharing!

#7 Scratch

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Posted 07 February 2008 - 02:46 PM

I must have missed that back then... thanks for the demo! Gotta keep my eyes open for a good sample.[Worthy]

#8 Bill B.

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Posted 07 February 2008 - 07:43 PM

Thanks Fred for the excellent idea and examples.

Wonder how it might work with a piece of pitted solid round or pipe on an e-wheel against a UHMW anvil or upper.
Bill
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#9 Fred Zweig

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Posted 07 February 2008 - 07:53 PM

The texture transfer can work with almost any hard surface. I have transfered concrete sidewalk to metal using this technique. It does eventually smooth out the concrete. Granite and other hard rocks work well. You may have to pick out the stone from the face of the metal.

Fred
"So much to learn and so little time"
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#10 Bill B.

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Posted 07 February 2008 - 08:02 PM

Fred,

Thanks! Cool idea, another that escaped me. Used to think how cool it would be to make an exposed aggregate coated bench with beach material (lots of small shells and pieces) from Rocky Point Mexico. Some of the beaches in California had cool stuff too. It could be used to to cast or imprint a more durable die, anvil or wheel.
Bill
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#11 Scratch

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 06:57 PM

Had a thought here while thinking of where I could get a rough textured chunk-O-steel...
would the "prized pieces of pitted hardened steel" have to be hardened?

Reason I ask is, it may be hard to find a big thick chunk of hardened steel, but I do alot of texturizing with my plasma cutter by gouging, getting the look of rough leather or even really rough deep gouges.
That could be made in any sized steel at all and would be easy to make.

Can't imagine that it would make a lot of difference except for slowly flattening the piece out, but it's easy to redo any time then.

Something like these.... minus the dime...[Welcome]
heavy_texture.jpg medium_texture.jpg

Anybody see a problem with putting this texure on a 2" thick chunk of scrap and using it for texture transfer to lighter guage metals?[Welcome]
Steve

#12 Bill B.

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 07:26 PM

Good idea Steve. Since I read Fred's idea it's been on my mind. Thought I had something pitted good enough but not so.

Thinking of making a small piece from an axle to fit in my Nibbler. Might smooth it out with a needle scaler. Should be hard enough for my sheet metal work with a UHMW die hitting it.

If you think it won't be hard enough for your work there's always case hardening material called Kasenit Hardening Compound. Enco has it for sure.
Bill
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#13 Fred Zweig

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Posted 11 February 2008 - 06:04 AM

These are great. Particularly for non ferrous metal. I suspect if you are tranfering onto red hot metal they would work well. I would not waste the time case hardening and instead just retexture the chuch of steel when it gets to smooth.

Fred
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#14 PTsideshow

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Posted 11 February 2008 - 07:02 AM

I have to agree with Fred and Bill, on the not hardening the steel piece. First if you are going by the rollers on the jewelry type rolling mills. Since there are about a dozen hardness scales and each one is different. Along with the fact that the most quoted one for some of the imports is the C scale and the high end or top number equals cast iron. Whats the point.
The other part with my playing around with my rolling mill and running screens, lace, dollies and shaped coper wire thru it. with annealed brass or copper sheets. Like Fred said hot stuff imprinted on the block, would work for steel, Its not like you would be doing wall paper repeat patterns. And there are ways to align that if that is what you what to do.
The other thing is you don't need to deep of impressions unless you will really be forcing the metal down it to them. So the thickness can be a little less for the texture plate. And you can put it on top of another and tack it along the edges for holding.
Your plates textures look good. When ya get done with them or need to freshen them up you can always cut them up and weld them together for a free standing sculpture.[Peace}[Welcome]
[Welcome]
glen

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All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only




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