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cool inlay idea.. feel free to hack and run with it..


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#21 marshablacksmith

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Posted 27 March 2007 - 07:27 AM

and yes... I will post pics of a successful inlay [Sorry]

I used my plasma cutter to slice some steel and then filled the cuts back in with brazing rod.. sand it all down smooth and voila! inlay.


Hi Everyone,

Thought I'd pass along a low tech method for brass flow-in. The attachment shows a handle section from a 17" long spatula. The design is stamped/chiseled into the metal, little bits (it's easy to use way too much) of brass are flattened and laid on top of the imprints and borax is sprinkled over the brass. The piece is returned to a well coked fire and heated slowly until the brass melts and flows everywhere,hopefully including the imprints. After cooling,the piece is filed smooth to reveal the contrasting brass design.

Inspiration for these designs comes from the book "To Draw, Upset and Weld" by Jeanette Lasansky.

#22 marshablacksmith

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Posted 27 March 2007 - 07:35 AM

and yes... I will post pics of a successful inlay [Sorry]

I used my plasma cutter to slice some steel and then filled the cuts back in with brazing rod.. sand it all down smooth and voila! inlay.


Hi Everyone,

Thought I'd pass along a low tech method for brass flow-in. The attachment shows a handle section from a 17" long spatula. The design is stamped/chiseled into the metal, little bits (it's easy to use way too much) of brass are flattened and laid on top of the imprints and borax is sprinkled over the brass. The piece is returned to a well coked fire and heated slowly until the brass melts and flows everywhere,hopefully including the imprints. After cooling,the piece is filed smooth to reveal the contrasting brass design.

Inspiration for these designs comes from the book "To Draw, Upset and Weld" by Jeanette Lasansky.

Marsha

DSCF4030.JPG

#23 Matt Weber

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Posted 27 March 2007 - 07:53 AM

Thanks for posting that Marsha! This technique has given me some ideas![Sorry]

#24 ornametalsmith

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Posted 27 March 2007 - 12:06 PM

this has been an interesting thread to follow. thought I'd throw out some more info I found that addressed the other way to do inlays. The other approach is the mechanical technique. Most commonly seen in guns and knives.

there are two metal inlay techniques in wide use today: 1. mechanical and 2. molten.

http://www.hooverand...articles/?id=20

thought this was interesting..... fwiw,
" It is important to note that if the insert can be seen from underneath the piece, it is not, strictly speaking, inlay."



enjoy [Sorry]
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#25 Stretch

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Posted 27 March 2007 - 12:33 PM


and yes... I will post pics of a successful inlay [Punk]

I used my plasma cutter to slice some steel and then filled the cuts back in with brazing rod.. sand it all down smooth and voila! inlay.


Hi Everyone,

Thought I'd pass along a low tech method for brass flow-in. The attachment shows a handle section from a 17" long spatula. The design is stamped/chiseled into the metal, little bits (it's easy to use way too much) of brass are flattened and laid on top of the imprints and borax is sprinkled over the brass. The piece is returned to a well coked fire and heated slowly until the brass melts and flows everywhere,hopefully including the imprints. After cooling,the piece is filed smooth to reveal the contrasting brass design.

Inspiration for these designs comes from the book "To Draw, Upset and Weld" by Jeanette Lasansky.

Marsha



Thanks Marsha. Good idea. Make sure you don't get it to hot or it will burn the tin out and you will have copper. I have played with brass a bit and have it turn to copper a few times.
I love the idea, lots of possibilities on my hardware.

[Angry][Sorry][Smile][Beer][Beer]
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#26 David Jacobson

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 08:15 AM

Here is a gold inlay of sailboats in a damascus knife done with a graver.
Gold and copper work the best as they dont work harden.

Dave

new knives 002.jpg new knives 001.jpg new knives 004.jpg new knives 013.jpg new knives 016.jpg

#27 bill h

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Posted 07 August 2008 - 05:57 PM

All,

Isn't it great to discover something cool like this?

Just for reference. All metals welded with DC neg. on tig such as copper, silicon bronze, aluminum bronze, magneze bronze, stainless, and steel, can all be done like this.

I have built stainless steel furniture a few times, and use bronze/copper to weld my joints.

Looks Cool, and will accept patina.

Bill

#28 hammerandblonde

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Posted 24 May 2009 - 09:20 PM

Hi Alliance
Here was my first effort at inlay. I cut in a line with a flat chisel and put a piece of copper wire and flattened it out. It didn't fill real good but has possibilities.

[Thinking][Beer][Beer][Happy]


in regards to the fill in your inlay piece the metal to be inlayed always needs to be a little deeper than your cut to fill the undercuts created otherwise you will see these holes. the metal needs to spread out so as a general rule more material is better you can always file the surface flat after inlaying.
hope that helps not hinders
cheers
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#29 Naturalsteel

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Posted 02 July 2009 - 09:59 PM

I've been playing with inlay with brazing rod too and then I run acrost this thread. I was looking for a more random look rather than a specific design so I laid down some weld beads and then filled in betwwen them with brazing rod. This is the first atempt. I realy like the animal print effect but have to figure out how to get rid of the voids I'm getting. Time to go read those links on brazing, especialy after I tried the same thing with stainless. My brazing just balled up like crazy. Even after a long soak in acid to clean it, I couldn't get it to flow.

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#30 R. McWilliams

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Posted 02 July 2009 - 10:05 PM

Interesting concept.

I find using the blue powder flux helps the brass to flow.
Heat the rod and dip it in the flux can.
It sort of wets the metal.

Thanks for the pics.

R.

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#31 PTsideshow

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Posted 03 July 2009 - 02:27 AM

If you are using the fluxed rod for brazing you might scrape most of it off the rod. Or if you are dipping it into the flux again use less. as a very little goes a long way. Since it is for show and not strength.

As with soldering cleanliness, is best you did say what type arc process you were using the cleaner the better. Like with stainless,aluminum welding you may want to get a stainless steel wire brush that you only use for this. This way you will avoid any cross contamination.
Using the same wire brush for steel and stainless can bring the type problems of carry over of bits of junk and cause rust spots at a later time.
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#32 Dark Wolf Forge

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Posted 03 July 2009 - 06:48 PM

Robert,
What is that beautiful piece of steel going to be used for? I like how it flows plus the inlay adds a nice touch.
[align=center][/align]Johnpaul

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#33 Naturalsteel

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Posted 06 July 2009 - 09:34 AM

Wolf,
Thanks, I've been itching to do some jewelry again so this was going to be a collar. If I can get happy with the brazing, then there would be two halves with about 1 1/2 in of bead weaving between them. I have some great antique metallic seed beads in bronze and silver that would form a fabric hinge between the two halves.
PT,
Thanks for the suggestion on scraping off the flux, I'll try that. I used to have some great flux for silver that did well with brass. Just been a while since I did any silver work so I haven't gotten around to ordering more from Rio Grande.
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#34 Reflection72

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Posted 13 May 2011 - 10:37 PM

I read about this years ago in a metalsmith book and have long forgotten until now.
If a plasma cutter is out of range another option is to use an acid mordant process to etch desired relief into substrate.

Bismuth melts at real low temp and forms VERY iridescent oxide when hot. Just a thought.
[Cool] Color is just a phenomenon of light reflection and/or absorption. To control the light and shadows is to be an artist.

#35 Kevin Caron

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Posted 14 May 2011 - 07:14 AM

All so works if you have a TIG and just weld it. No flux to clean up.
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#36 gearhartironwerks

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 08:12 PM

I do agree with Warren about using powder flux, rather than the coated rod. A little goes a long way. You can mix your own with borax powder and water or alky than use a brush to put a little on. The glass slag that results does cause problems with finishing painting, waxing or patinas. And here I always thought it was because I was old school.


I bought a cheapo sandblaster head from...gasp...Harbor Freight. It works well to remove the excess glass slag. Also, I use a nickle-silver rod that blends in nicely with forged steel when wire wheeled.

John




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